Finding help… and friends… (who can relate to mild/moderate hearing loss)

I’ve been so busy lately, and AC has been doing so well, that it’s been easy to forget about updating this blog.  Yet, every once in a while… something, or some ONE, reminds me of why I started this blog a few years back.  This is what happened just recently when I received an email from a woman who had found this blog, and she could relate to much of it. 

Her son is now in third grade, has mild/moderate hearing loss, has not had an IEP or 504 – and didn’t seem to need one.. until now.  And, now the school is telling her he doesn’t qualify, because he isn’t failing anything…  and, that his “problems” are “behavioral” and not “hearing loss related”.   Continue reading

Mild Hearing Loss or ADD??

I want to share another thing I learned that blew me away in our “year of discovery” (when AC was in 3rd grade).  Apparently, a lot of kids that are HOH get misdiagnosed as having ADD – Attention Deficit Disorder.  AC was almost one of them.  That was how we figured out he needed the FM and all – because his teacher started saying all these little negative “behavioral” things were happening. Things like many of the ones noted on this list from phonic ear.  Check out the chart: 

Similarities Between Mild Hearing Loss & Attention Deficit Disorder
Similarities Between Mild Hearing Loss & Attention Deficit Disorder

Maybe, this information is old news now… but, when I first heard this I had a HUGE “light-bulb moment”.  I wish I had known this information BEFORE that point.  So, maybe this will help someone else out there who’s just starting off with a child diagnosed with mild hearing loss.  

At the time I discovered this (thru my OWN research) we were in the process of weeks of jumping through hoops. 
Continue reading

So… What’s YOUR Problem?!

jan2006-downAs I mentioned before, the year AC was in 3rd grade was a bit of a rough year for us. It was the first time he really ever “got in trouble” in school. He was basically being misunderstood, and was falsely accused of misbehaving, when he simply wasn’t hearing. 

Third grade was also the first time that AC really got a taste of being picked on or singled out by other kids because of his hearing aids… and of course he didn’t like it. Fortunately, the picking on was a few isolated cases… and, he always had lots of friends –  but, even a little “teasing/bullying” is hard to take.  Being the only kid you know who wears hearing aids makes you different, and being “different” when you’re a kid can be difficult.  The fact that this was also the time his teacher was suddenly on his case for “misbehaving” probably didn’t help.

On this particular afternoon back in third grade, AC came home mad.  He didn’t want to wear his hearing aids anymore. “I don’t NEED them!”, he said.

Of course, what he really wanted was NOT to be different. Not to Continue reading

Acknowledging the needs of children with mild hearing loss…

I was surfing, and found a post about a recent study and article, called: Effect of Minimal Hearing Loss on Children’s Ability to Multitask in Quiet and in Noise“.  The full text in a PDF format, and more info can be found here: http://lshss.asha.org/cgi/content/abstract/39/3/342
The abstract reads:

Effect of Minimal Hearing Loss on Children’s Ability to Multitask in Quiet and in Noise
  – Brittany McFadden, Andrea Pittman, Arizona State University, Tempe

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of minimal hearing loss (HL) on children’s ability to perform simultaneous tasks in quiet and in noise.
Method: Ten children with minimal HL and 11 children with normal hearing (NH) participated. Both groups ranged in age from 8 to 12 years. The children categorized common words (primary task) while completing dot-to-dot games (secondary task) in quiet as well as in noise presented at 0 dB and +6 dB signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). It was hypothesized that the children’s progression through the dot-to-dot games would slow as they encountered more difficult listening environments. This hypothesis was based on the theory that listeners have limited cognitive resources to allocate to any combination of tasks.
Results: The dot rate of both groups decreased similarly in the multitasking conditions relative to baseline. However, no other differences between groups or listening conditions were revealed. Significantly poorer word categorization was observed for the children with minimal HL in noise.
Conclusion: These data suggest that children with minimal HL may be unable to respond to a difficult listening task by drawing resources from other tasks to compensate.

I found this article very interesting… a little discouraging… but, mostly I am glad that this is being researched and that the needs of children with mild hearing loss is being acknowledged. > Continue reading